Dallas man sentenced in plot targeting gay men for violent crimes using a dating app

A Dallas man has been sentenced in a scheme to target gay men for violent crimes using the dating app Grindr, according to the Department of Justice.

Daniel Jenkins, 22, was sentenced Wednesday to a maximum of 26 years in federal prison on charges including kidnapping, carjacking and hate crimes. He is the last of four defendants to be sentenced in the case, according to a release from the DOJ.

Jenkins pleaded guilty to the charges in June.

“This defendant singled out victims based on their perceived sexual orientation, then viciously assaulted them. The Department of Justice will not tolerate these sorts of heinous, hate-based attacks,” said Acting US Attorney Chad Meacham for the Northern District of Texas. “Unfortunately, despite our best efforts, bigots often lurk online. We urge users of dating apps like Grindr to remain vigilant.”

The plot began in December 2017, according to the release. Jenkins and a co-conspirator created profiles on Grindr to lure men to locations where they would rob them, the DOJ said.

On one occasion, Jenkins admitted that he and a group of others brought multiple victims to an apartment complex where they robbed them at gunpoint and assaulted them, injuring at least one of the victims, the release said.

Members of the group used gay slurs as they taunted victims, and one of the perpetrators attempted to sexually assault a victim, the DOJ said Jenkins admitted.

The other men — Michael Atkinson, Pablo Ceniceros-Deleon and Daryl Henry — also have pleaded guilty, and their sentences range from 11 to 22 years in prison.

“This sentence affirms that bias-motivated crimes run contrary to our national values and underscores the Justice Department’s commitment to aggressively prosecuting bias-motivated crimes, including crimes against the LGBTQI community. We will continue to pursue justice for victims of bias-motivated crimes, wherever they occur,” said Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division.

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Disneyland Figures Out a New to Make More Money

Disneyland Figures Out a New to Make More Money


AP Photo/Jae C. Hong


(CNN Business) – Millions of guests visit Disney theme parks each year, and most of them probably loathe waiting 90 minutes to ride “Peter Pan’s Flight.” So now Disney is rolling out a new service that will help park goers streamline their visits and cut down on wait times.

Genie” — which debuts this fall at California’s Disneyland and Florida’s Disney World — is a new digital service that will “maximize your park time, so you can have more fun,” according to the company.

“From specific attractions, foodie experiences and entertainment, to general interests like Disney princesses, villains, Pixar, Star Wars, thrill rides and more — just tell Disney Genie what you want to do and it will do the planning for you,” Disney (DIS) said in a blog post on Wednesday.

Disney Parks Chairman Josh D’Amaro told CNN Business this week that the company listened to guests who want the theme park experience to be simpler, straightforward and tailored “for them.”

“You tell Genie what you are interested in specifically — whether that be an attraction, a food, a character — and Genie’s going to come back to you and tell you how to make the most of your day,” D’Amaro said.

The free service will be built into Disney Parks’ established apps along with a paid version called “Disney Genie+” that allows guests to access the “Lightning Lane” for $15 at Disney World and $20 at Disneyland.

“Lightning Lane” is basically a paid version of a benefit that used to be free for guests: Disney’s FastPass, which allowed visitors to book ride and attraction times in advance to avoid long waits.

As Disneyland retires the Fastpass and unveils their new pay-for Genie+ service to manage lines/crowds, Nikki Medoro and Bret Burkhart wonder if people will actually pay more to avoid lines. Also, Brett Favre says kids should avoid tackle football before age 14.